Tag: Friends of WPVM

History of Radio

History of Radio

Edwin Howard Armstrong is featured in Ken Burns “Empire of the Air Documentary”.  Click Here

Ken Burns: Empire of the Air; The Men Who Made Radio

Ken Burns: Empire of the Air - The Men Who Made Radio

For 50 years radio dominated the airwaves and the American consciousness as the first “mass medium.” In Empire of the Air: The Men Who Made Radio, Ken Burns examines the lives of three extraordinary men who shared the primary responsibility for this invention and its early success, and whose genius, friendship, rivalry and enmity interacted in tragic ways. This is the story of Lee de Forest, a clergyman’s flamboyant son, who invented the audion tube; Edwin Howard Armstrong, a brilliant, withdrawn inventor who pioneered FM technology; and David Sarnoff, a hard-driving Russian immigrant who created the most powerful communications company on earth.

Against the backdrop of radio’s “Golden Age,” Empire of the Air relates the history of radio through archival photographs, newsreels of the period and interviews with such well-known radio personalities as Garrison Keillor, the late sports commentator Red Barber, radio dramatist Norman Corwin and the late broadcast historian Erik Barnouw.


For a Brief Time in the  1930s, Radio Station WLW in Ohio Became America’s One and Only “Super Station”

HUMANITIES, May/June 2015, Volume 36, Number 3

“When President Franklin Roosevelt, sitting in the White House, pushed a ceremonial button on his desk in May 1934, a five hundred thousand-watt (500 kW) behemoth stirred in a field outside Cincinnati. Rows of five-foot glass tubes warmed. Water flowed around them at more than six hundred gallons per minute. Dozens of engineers lit filaments and flipped switches, and, within the hour, enough power to supply a town of one hundred thousand coursed through an 831-foot tower.

Thus began WLW’s five-year, twenty-four-hour-a-day experiment: a radio station that used more power and transmitted more miles than any station in the United States had or would. The so-called super station—licensed by the new Federal Communications Commission (FCC) on a temporary basis—amped up the debate among broadcasters, government regulators, and listeners about how radio should be delivered to serve the “public interest,” a mandate laid out in the Radio Act of 1927, and influenced legal, programming, and technical decisions that shape the broadcast system we know today.”    Cnt’d on this link   America’s One and Only SUPER STATION

 

 

Appalachian  Journey with Alan Lomax

 

 

Go inside one of the greatest-ever untold stories: how the ordinary people of America were given the opportunity to make records for the first time.

Click on phonograph photo to go to PBS’  page

AMERICAN EPIC three-part historical documentary will air in the U.S. on PBS on Tuesdays May 16, 23 and 30 at 9 p.m. (check local listings).

British documentary about record making.

 

WPVM Featured in “Capital at Play” Magazine

WPVM Featured in “Capital at Play” Magazine

Ms. Davyne Dial and Dr. Herb Johnson, president and treasurer of Friends of WPVM,
Inc.—and husband and wife—are featured with nine other regional non-profits in
the November issue of
Capital at Play magazine. The
couple is profiled 
in an informative two-page spread about how they came to be involved with the station.
 
Additionally, other station volunteers,
including Blaine Greenfield, host of “Blaine’s World,” and Jessica Rice, host of “NC
Serves Veterans Radio Hour,” are featured in a section called 
“Fun for a Better WNC.” 

Davyne and Herb thank editor Fred Mills and his staff for including WPVM is this distinctive annual issue! The magazine is available at a number of locations in the WNC region.


Radio History

Radio History

 

For anyone
who has visited the WPVM studios in downtown Asheville this summer, they would have noticed a “work
in progress”—displays of vintage radios and informational posters being
arranged and rearranged around the station’s cozy lobby!
 
WPVM’s Davyne Dial and
Herb Johnson are putting together a unique historical mini-tour and exhibition, “Asheville World of Radio.” (Inspired by Herb’s collection of radios and accessories as
well as his knowledge of radio history.)
 
Stay tuned
for announcements about the exhibition opening to the public!
~

NATIONAL RADIO DAY  

Each year on August 20th, National Radio Day recognizes the great invention of the radio. Celebrate the news, information, music, and stories carried across the airwaves.

Several inventors had a part in the invention of the radio in the late 1800s. Amazingly, not just one person can be credited with its beginning. Each component developed through invention and discovery. As these technologies converged, the radio came to life.
THE CONTRIBUTORS
In the paragraphs that follow, a noted international effort contributed to the conception of the radio. In Germany, the research of Heinrich Hertz proved electricity could be transmitted wirelessly. Elsewhere, the multiple patents of the prolific inventor Nikola Tesla provided the radio with the Tesla coil. Born in Croatia, Tesla also contributed many patents involving alternating current advancing the science and production of numerous inventions. When it comes to the first commercially available wireless, Italian, Guglielmo Marconi receives the honor.   
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 In radio, you have two tools. Sound and silence. ~ Ira Glass
While entertainment and music fill the airwaves today, they were not the radio’s first functions. First, the wireless radio served the military. It also provided a regular public service role. Much like the dits and dots of a telegram, the wireless transmitted information. On board the Titanic at the time of its sinking, a Marconi wireless broadcast the ship’s distress signal. However, in 1906, the first radio broadcast of voice and music purely for entertainment purposes aired. Reginald Fessenden transmitted the program from Brant Rock, Massachusetts for the general public to hear. The Canadian born scientist would go on to many more successes in his lifetime.      
BROADCASTS
As wireless came alive, the first broadcast stations began airing programs in the 1920s. News and world events were the first items over the airwaves.
  • Radio ownership grew. In 1931, two out of five homes owned a radio. By 1938, four out of five owned a radio.  
  • According to FCC statistics, at the end of 2012, there were more than 15,000 licensed broadcast radio stations in the U.S.
  • On October 1, 1999, the first satellite radio broadcast occurred. Worldspace aired the broadcast in Africa. 
The founder of National Day Calendar hosts a radio talk show.  The “Guru of Geek” Marlo Anderson hosts the Tech Ranch, featuring discussions on technology for everyday life.  Click here to listen.

HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalRadioDay

To celebrate National Radio Day, listen to your favorite radio station. Give special recognition to the station, radio personalities and the programs that make your days better.  Use #NationalRadioDay to post on social media. 
Educators, join the National Day Calendar Classroom to get your students involved in National Radio Day with crosswords puzzles, a podcast and more! Every week the classroom offers a variety of lessons and projects to keep children engaged and learning.